The right-wing are taking the tools, traditions and the myths of the left wing

The phenomenon of the right-wing appropriating the tools, traditions, and mythos of the left wing is a complex and multifaceted issue. This strategic attempt by conservative forces to reshape the political and cultural landscape by co-opting symbols, narratives, and strategies traditionally associated with progressive movements. It poses a significant challenge for the left, as it risks diluting the effectiveness of progressive ideas and undermining efforts to achieve social and political change.

To effectively mediate this repurposing and ensure a better-balanced outcome, the left must engage in strategic and proactive measures. Here are some tools and approaches to considered:

  1. Reclaiming Narratives: The left must actively reclaim and assert control over its narratives, symbols, and values. This involves articulating a clear and compelling vision for social justice, equality, and solidarity, and consistently communicating it through various channels, including media, art, and grassroots organizing.
  2. Counter-Messaging: In response to the right-wing’s appropriation of progressive rhetoric, the left should develop counter-messaging strategies that expose the contradictions and falsehoods inherent in conservative narratives. This will involve fact-checking, debunking misinformation, and highlighting the real-world consequences of right-wing policies and agendas.
  3. Cultural Production: The left can leverage the power of cultural production—such as music, film, literature, and visual art—to promote progressive values and inspire social change. By creating and amplifying cultural works that reflect the diversity, resilience, and aspirations of communities, the left can challenge the hegemony of right-wing cultural narratives.
  4. Community Organizing: Grassroots community organizing remains a potent tool for social and political transformation. The left should prioritize building strong, inclusive, and resilient communities that are capable of mobilizing for collective change and challenge. This involves fostering solidarity, building alliances across diverse constituencies, and empowering left voices.
  5. Policy Advocacy: The left must continue to advocate for progressive policies and reforms that address systemic inequalities and promote social justice. This includes campaigning for issues such as economic redistribution, healthcare access, environmental protection, racial justice, and LGBTQ+ issues. By advancing concrete policy solutions, the left demonstrates its commitment to improving the material conditions of real world communities.
  6. Critical Engagement: Finally, the left should engage in critical dialogue and reflection on its own internal dynamics, strategies, and blind spots. This involves interrogating power relations within progressive movements, addressing issues of privilege and exclusion, and fostering a #4opens culture of accountability and self-critique. By continuously evolving and adapting to changing political realities, the left can remain relevant and resilient in the face of right-wing co-optation.

In conclusion, navigating the challenges posed by right-wing appropriation requires a proactive approach that combines strategic communication, cultural production, community organizing, policy advocacy, and critical engagement. By reclaiming its narratives, values, and agency, the left can effectively mediate the repurposing of its tools and traditions, ultimately contributing to the change we need in the era of #climatechoas and worship of the #deathcult of the right.

A look at the recent history of radical grassroots activism

#ClimateCamp was a radical grassroots direct action movement to directly challenge #climatechoas and raise awareness about climate change and advocate for solutions to mitigate its effects. The movement was made up of a loosely organized network of activists who used a diversity of tactics to achieve their goals. Climate Camps were established in many countries. The movement reached its peak in the late 2000s and early 2010s and had a significant impact on public debate and government policy.

#Protestcamps are gatherings of activists who set up temporary camps in public spaces in order to bring attention to a cause or issue. The goal of these camps is to create a direct action space where people come together, discuss and demonstrate. The camps may range from #fluffy peaceful gatherings to more #spiky disruptive and confrontational events, depending on the nature of the issue protested and the diversity of tactics of the activists involved. Some well-known examples of protest camps include #Occupy, #ClimateCamp

#CriticalMass a decentralized activism movement started in 1992. The movement is centred around a monthly direct action bike ride where participants gather to raise awareness about car culture.
The idea behind Critical Mass is to reclaim public space for cyclists and to assert the right of cyclists to use the roads. The rides are often a festive and celebratory event. The Critical Mass movement has since spread to cities around the world, with similar events taking place in many cities.

Using #openweb tools like #RSS and #ActivityPub has several benefits in the context of direct action and grassroots politics.
Decentralization: RSS and ActivityPub are decentralized technologies that are not controlled by any single entity, making them resistant to censorship and control.
Interoperability: By using open standards like ActivityPub, organizations and individuals can communicate and share content with each other, regardless of the platform they use.
Transparency: The use of #openweb tools can increase transparency and accountability in the political process, allowing for greater public scrutiny and engagement.
Ownership: By using #opensource tools, individuals and organizations can own and control their data, rather than relying on proprietary services controlled by corporations.
Accessibility: By using open web technologies, information can be more easily accessible to those who are marginalized or excluded from the mainstream, enabling more inclusive and equitable participation in the political process.

Direct action and grassroots politics are important tools for effecting social change. Direct action refers to forms of activism that seeks to achieve a goal directly, without intermediaries, often through disruptive or confrontational means. Direct action can include strikes, sit-ins, blockades, and other forms of resistance.
Grassroots politics refers to a political movement or approach that is bottom-up, rather than top-down, meaning it seeks to empower citizens to take action on political issues, rather than relying on traditional power structures such as political parties or government. Grassroots politics aims to give a voice to marginalized or underrepresented communities, and to create change from the ground up.
Together, direct action and grassroots politics offer a way for people to engage in the political process and to bring about change in a democratic and inclusive way. By taking action outside of traditional political channels, activists and communities bring about change on issues that they care about.

#Fediverse is a #openweb decentralized social network ecosystem consisting of independent, user-run servers that are all compatible with each other. This allows for a more open and democratic internet experience, as users can choose to participate in a variety of online communities without relying on any single centralized platform.
The Fediverse is seen as a more privacy-friendly alternative to the #dotcons this is a working “white lie” based on #4opens thinking.

#XR “Extinction Rebellion,” is a global social movement that uses nonviolent civil disobedience to protest against the failure of governments to take action on the climate and ecological crisis. The movement seeks to disrupt the status quo and force political leaders to take immediate action to address the crisis. The movement was founded in the UK in 2018 and has since spread to other countries around the world, with a focus on large-scale protests and acts of civil disobedience.

#XR is a protest movement, some people classify XR as a #spiky radical protest movement due to its tactics and goals, but others consider it more liberal because of its commitment to #fluffy nonviolence. Ultimately, the classification of XR as radical or liberal depends on individuals looking at the problem, it’s a debate.

Programming and ideology are different areas that intersect.
Ideology refers to a set of beliefs, values, and assumptions that shape an understanding of the world and people’s place in it. In the context of programming, ideology comes into play when a programmer brings their often #mainstreaming values and beliefs to the coding they write and the systems they build. You can see this in the copying of the #dtcons to build the #fediverse and how this is now shaping the #openweb

Discussing #postmodernism and the criticism to “isms”. The idea is that blindly following a particular ideology can make a person a “zombie” to limit the ability to think critically. The phrase #nothingnew is used to suggest that fresh thinking on old issues is needed, rather than blindly following existing dead #mainstreaming ideologies. The use of ad hominem arguments, which is a type of logical fallacy that attacks an individual rather than the argument they are making, is clearly #blocking

The #OMN is a project focused on linking alt/grassroots media. In the context of the need for a rebooted #openweb and avoiding the #blocking of this by #fashernista and #geekproblem agenda.

The #OpenWeb is the internet where information and content is accessible to all, regardless of their location, device or network, and can be shared, linked, and re-used without restrictions or barriers imposed by proprietary platforms, walled gardens, or monopolistic practices. It is based on #4opens and aims to provide a more inclusive, equitable, and participatory world.
The #OpenWeb is often contrasted with the #closedweb or “walled garden web”, where content and data are locked behind proprietary platforms, controlled by corporations or governments, and subject to limitations, restrictions, and surveillance. The #dotcons

On the wider subject of this thread, Identity politics and the agender it pushes.

In the face of growing #climatechoas and our attention being trapped inside the #dotcons I see most people as complete fantasists and see the worship of the #deathcult as their main motivation.

In the next 5-10 years I see a lot of BLOCKING and lots of blowing of smoke to cover this behaver.

I live on a lifeboat, it’s not a metaphor.

The start of this post is the BLOCKING and the smoke blowing am talking about on this blog.

The end is “feel good/bad”, which is just the chatting classes talking to the chattering classes.

There are people who are not a part of the chattering classes who have agendas as the blog post says in the end.

Diversity is a good (ecological) thing, and the chattering classes as the blog post says are VERY bad at noticing their active role in our social poverty on this one.

Anti dogmatic thinking

Brining #indymediaback

The fallow flower beds/farm that is #indymedia needs to be bought back to life slowly with as little change to the structure as possible. In our current social tech state just about ANY change will start ripping and when this starts it escalates quickly to do real damage. The original 2000-2008’ish structures cover 90% of issues in a good way, let’s live with that for a while.

The are a host of outstanding big issues in the remaining 10% that are undefined – lets concentrate our energies on these missing bits and roll out solutions respecting “diversity of tactics”. The ansears to the missing 10% generally cannot be found pre-defined, we should be very weary of people coming in with fixed agender. Diversity and good process in hand with on the ground #4opens working overtime as a part of the real network is the ONLY valued test.

Slow/diversity/nurture vs fast/dogmatic/tearing. To highlight now before we roll out bigger, there will be lots of the second and little of the first much of the time. It is just how it is…

* #4opens is not dogma, it’s simply the last 30 years of open source development codified as social structure.

* PGA is not dogma, it’s the embodied wishes/dreams and planning of thousands of peoples over meany country’s and years of time.

* Indymedia is not dogma, it’s the expirence of meany radical media groups coming together to build an open network to fight neo-liberalism (#deathcult) on the ground, in the streets, in the fields and online.

The difference between indymedia and the hundreds of failed “radical” media projects over the last 20 years is that indymedia flourished for a good time before it succumbed to the “forgetting” of the #PGA and #4opens foundation it was built on and was thus helpless against the internal forces that ripped it apart. Leaving  no malubilerty to shift to the heavy blows from the forces attacking from the outside.

We core crew need to learn how to become benign older folks who answer every “better” solution put forward by the thrusting young with “how does that work with the #4opens” then fallow up with “lets look to see if that furthers the PGA hallmarks” to all their enthusiastic “youth” energy for “change”. Keep it gentle and most importantly, keep the focus…

At meany stages there will be howling mobs soured by hatred and through wing shit to create a stinking mess… our job is to keep focus and calm… a hard thing to do in a messy/disaster world #Brexit and #climatechoas pushes, but it’s the simple job we are taking on.